Does Azle represent the tipping point, leading to more protective regulations on fracking?

Located some 15 miles northwest of Fort Worth, the small city of Azle — some 11,000 folks – seems an unlikely place to start a revolution for better regulations or even a moratorium on fracking and the related disposal of oil and gas wastes in “injection wells.” Primarily an anglo and middle-class town – many of whom commute to the Dallas-Fort Worth area — and best known as the gateway to Eagle Mountain Lake — a large dam on the Trinity River –  a bunch of tremors and earthquakes – including one last night — has led to citizen concern over the cumulative impacts of all that injection of water and wastes underground. In fact some of these tremors have occurred near or below Eagle Mountain lake.

The first official citizen response was the January 2nd town hall meeting with RRC Commissioner Porter — typified by angry citizens asking for better regulations or even a time-out on fracking and injection wells. Many seemed aghast that the RRC did not have better answers about the relationship between the recent tremors plaguing the area and the oil and gas activities and that further regulations were not yet being considered. Then a few days later, Porter announced the RRC would hire a seismologist to “assess the science.”

And the citizens are meeting again, this time with EarthWorks to discuss what is known and possible regulations. Here is some information about that meeting.

Still need answers about fracking earthquakes?

Don’t ask questions, demand answers.

Learn how. Come to the Azle Community Center on Jan 13th.

WHAT:
A meeting to find out how to force our “regulators” to do their jobs and protect our property and communities.

WHY:
The town hall meeting the Texas Railroad Commission held on January 2nd to discuss earthquakes connecting with hydraulic fracturing was disappointing.

While Azle residents are at risk and their children practice earthquake drills, our regulators ducked questions and dashed away from the meeting to watch a football game.

The RRC’s behavior at the town hall, and previously, shows they are not interested in overseeing the oil and gas industry so much as providing political cover for it.

WHO:
Earthworks’ Oil & Gas Accountability Project
North Central Texas Communities Alliance
Calvin Tillman, former Mayor of Dish, Texas

WHEN:
Monday January 13 at 6:30 pm

WHERE:
Azle Community Center
404 West Main

CONTACT:
Sharon Wilson 940-389-1622

In the meantime, Earthworks, Sierra Club and many others are looking at what regulations are needed. A good resource is a white paper published on seismicity impacts of oil and gas resources published on the Groundwater Protection Council website. See here.

As an example, the State of Ohio through executive and then legislative action, developed the following new requirements for injection wells disposing of oil and gas waste. This information is from the above white paper.

“The new UIC Class II saltwater injection well rules proceeded through the legislative process, were passed and went into effect in October 2012. The ODNR started to issue new Class II saltwater injection well permits again in November 2012. The new permits incorporated theWhite Paper on Induced Seismicity Page 34

requirements from the new regulations. The chief of the division issuing the permits could include various new monitoring on a case-by-case basis:

• Pressure fall-off testing,

• Geological investigation of potential faulting within the immediate vicinity of the

proposed injection,

• Submittal of a seismic monitoring plan,

• Testing and recording of original bottomhole injection interval pressure,

• Minimum geophysical logging suite, such as gamma ray, compensated density-neutron,

and resistivity logs,

• Radioactive tracer or spinner survey, and

• Any such other tests the chief deems necessary.

In addition the new permits would not allow drilling and completion of the wells into the Precambrian basement rock. No injection would be allowed until the results of the monitoring are evaluated. Upon review of the data, the chief can withhold injection authority, require plugging of the well, or allow injection to commence. The chief has the authority to implement a graduated maximum allowable injection pressure. All new Class II injection wells must continuously monitor the injection and annulus pressures to maintain mechanical integrity. They must include a shut-off device installed on the injection pump set to the maximum allowable injection pressure.”

Since the RRC already has an open project on developing new rules for injection wells, now is the time to add new regulations to protect the citizens of Azle – and the rest of Texas.

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